Now showing 1 - 10 of 11
  • Publication
    Burnout and motivation to study medicine among students during the COVID-19 pandemic
    (Frontiers Media SA, 2023) ; ; ;
    Clio Metakides
    ;
    Lena Pielemeier
    ;
    Dimitrios G. Mytilinaios
    ;
    Chryso Pieridi
    ;
    Elizabeth O. Johnson
    ;
    Dimitrios Ntourakis
    ;
    Ilias P. Nikas
    Aim: To investigate medical students’ burnout and motivation levels in each of the six years of their studies during the COVID-19 pandemic and identify independent predictors of burnout and motivation. Methods: An anonymous cross-sectional survey was sent to the students of all six years within our school. Burnout was measured with the adapted Oldenburg Burnout Inventory questionnaire (OLBI-S) and motivation with the updated Strength of Motivation for Medical School (SMMS-R) questionnaire. Univariate analysis was performed with the Kruskal–Wallis test and Spearman’s correlation, while multivariable analysis with linear regression models. Results: A total of 333 medical students (52% of student body) responded. Higher burnout levels correlated with lower motivation to study medicine (rho = −0.30, p < 0.001). Burnout levels differed between the six years of medical studies, peaking in years two and four whereas being the lowest in year one (p = 0.01). Motivation levels differed significantly as well, peaking in years one and four whereas being the lowest in years five and six (p = 0.012). In the multivariable linear regression models, being a female (b = 2.22, p = 0.016), studying in the fourth year vs. first year (b = 2.54, p = 0.049), having a perceived beginner/intermediate vs. advanced/expert technology level (b = 2.05, p = 0.032) and a perceived poor school support system (b = 6.35, p < 0.001) were independently associated with higher burnout levels. Furthermore, studying in the fifth year vs. first year (b = −5.17, p = 0.019) and a perceived poor school support system (b = −3.09, p = 0.01) were independently associated with a reduced motivation to study medicine. Conclusion: Our study highlighted potential areas for intervention to decrease the rate of burnout and low motivation among medical students. However, further research is needed to unravel the full effect of the pandemic on medical students.
  • Publication
    The impact of seasonal influenza vaccination uptake on COVID-19 vaccination attitudes in a rural area in Greece
    (Elsevier Ltd, 2023) ; ;
    Andria Papazachariou
    ;
    Onoufrios Malikides
    ;
    Maria Stamatelatou
    ;
    Nektaria Vasilaki
    ;
    Athanasia Milioni
    ;
    Maria Dasenaki
    ;
    Nikolaos Spernovasilis
    Introduction: Promoting vaccination for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), especially for high-risk groups such as the elderly and persons with comorbidities, is important for reducing the incidence of severe disease and death. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study of factors associated with COVID-19 vaccination, including previous influenza vaccination, among all persons who received medical services in a rural area in Crete, Greece, between October 2020-May 2021. Results: Among 3129 participants, receipt of influenza vaccination in 2020–21 was strongly associated with COVID-19 vaccination, as was influenza vaccination in 2019–20, albeit to a lesser extent. In addition, persons older than 59 years (with exception of those 90 + years old) and those who lived closer to the hospital/health center, were more likely to vaccinate for COVID-19. Persons younger than 40 years of age, females, persons with mental illness or neurologic disease, were also less likely to vaccinate for COVID-19 (all p < 0.001). Conclusions: COVID-19 vaccination was more likely among those who were vaccinated for influenza before and during the pandemic. Access to healthcare services and specific comorbidities, were important influencers for vaccination, underlying the importance of tailored interventions to enforce vaccination in high-risk groups.
  • Publication
    Pill versus vaccine for COVID-19: Is there a genuine dilemma?
    (Elsevier Masson s.r.l., 2022-04) ;
    S.P. Papadakos
    ;
    N. Mazonakis
    ;
    M. Papadakis
    ;
    N. Spernovasilis
  • Publication
    Beau’s Lines and COVID-19; A Systematic Review on Their Association
    (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), 2024-03) ;
    Aris P. Agouridis
    ;
    Christina Mastori-Kourmpani
    ;
    Polyna Antoniou
    ;
    Paschalis Konstantinou
    ;
    Evangelos C. Rizos
    Background: Beau’s lines are transverse grooves in the nail plate that result from transient interruption of the growth of the proximal nail matrix after severe disease. The aim of this study is to systematically report all evidence on the association of Beau’s lines with COVID-19 infection or vaccination against COVID-19. Methods: PubMed and Scopus databases were searched up to January 2024 for articles reporting Beau’s lines associated with COVID-19 infection or vaccination for COVID-19. PROSPERO ID: CRD42024496830. Results: PubMed search identified 299 records while Scopus search identified 18 records. After screening the bibliography, nine studies including 35 cases were included in our systematic review. The studies were reported from different areas around the world. Included studies documented Beau’s lines following COVID-19 vaccination (two studies) or after COVID-19 infection (seven studies). High variability was recorded in onset and resolution times among included cases, averaging 3 months and 6 months after COVID-19 infection, respectively. In the two studies reporting Beau’s lines after vaccination, onset was at 7 days and 6 weeks and resolution occurred after 8 and 17 weeks, respectively. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic review reporting the association of Beau’s lines with COVID-19 infection and vaccination. Severe immune response can result in the formation of these nail disorders. Of importance, Beau’s lines represent a potential indicator of prior severe COVID-19 infection or vaccination for COVID-19, as well as a sign of long COVID-19 syndrome.
  • Publication
    Oral Molnupiravir and Nirmatrelvir/Ritonavir for the Treatment of COVID-19: A Literature Review with a Focus on Real-World Evidence
    (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), 2023-12)
    Ioannis Karniadakis
    ;
    Nikolaos Mazonakis
    ;
    Michail Papadakis
    ;
    Ioulia Markaki
    ;
    Nikolaos Spernovasilis
    ;
    Vaccines remain the cornerstone of medical prevention and are highly effective in reducing the risk of severe disease and death due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In the context of expanding the therapeutic armamentarium against COVID-19, molnupiravir (Lagevrio) and ritonavir-boosted nirmatrelvir (Paxlovid) were developed, constituting the first effective oral treatments against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In this narrative review, we retrospectively inquired into the clinical trials and real-world studies investigating the efficacy of these agents. Overall, clinical trials and real-world studies have demonstrated the efficacy of both agents in reducing hospitalization and death rates in COVID-19 patients. As per current recommendations, their use is suggested in patients with mild to moderate symptoms who are at high risk of developing severe disease. Nevertheless, limited data exist regarding their efficacy in specific subpopulations, such as immunocompromised patients, those with severe kidney disease, pregnant women, and children.
  • Publication
    Epidemics and pandemics: Is human overpopulation the elephant in the room?
    (Elsevier Masson s.r.l., 2021-12) ;
    N. Spernovasilis
    ;
    I. Markaki
    ;
    M. Papadakis
    ;
    L. Markaki
  • Publication
    Gaps in Knowledge About SARS-CoV-2 & COVID-19 Among University Students Are Associated With Negative Attitudes Toward People With COVID-19: A Cross-Sectional Study in Cyprus
    (Frontiers Media S.A, 2021-11-19) ; ;
    Nicos Middleton
    ;
    Ourania Kolokotroni
    ;
    Panagiotis Theodosis-Nobelos
    ;
    Ioannis Mamais
    ;
    Maria Pantelidou
    ;
    Dimitrios Tsaltas
    ;
    Eirini Christaki
    ;
    Georgios Nikolopoulos
    ;
    Nikolas Dietis
    University students represent a highly active group in terms of their social activity in the community and in the propagation of information on social media. We aimed to map the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of University students in Cyprus about severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to guide targeted future measures and information campaigns. We used a cross-sectional online survey targeting all students in conventional, not distance-learning, programs in five major universities in the Republic of Cyprus. Students were invited to participate through the respective Studies and Student Welfare Office of each institution. The survey was made available in English and Greek on REDCap. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. The questionnaire was developed based on a consensus to cover the main factual information directed by official channels toward the general public in Cyprus at the time of the survey. In addition to sociodemographic information (N = 8), the self-administered questionnaire consisted of 19 questions, assessing the knowledge regarding the characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, infection prevention and control measures (N = 10), perceptions related to COVID-19, for instance, whether strict travel measures are necessary (N = 4), and attitudes toward a hypothetical person infected (N = 2). Furthermore, participants were asked to provide their own assessment of their knowledge about COVID-19 and specifically with regard to the main symptoms and ways of transmission (N = 3). The number of students who completed the survey was 3,641 (41% studying Health/Life Sciences). Amongst them, 68.8% responded correctly to at least 60% of knowledge-related questions. Misconceptions were identified in 30%. Only 29.1% expressed a positive attitude toward a hypothetical person with COVID-19 without projecting judgment (9.2%) or blame (38%). Odds of expressing a positive attitude increased by 18% (95% CI 13–24%; p < 0.001) per unit increase in knowledge. Postgraduate level education was predictive of better knowledge (odds ratio (OR) 1.81; 95% CI 1.34–2.46; p < 0.001 among doctoral students] and positive attitude [OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.01–1.80; p = 0.04). In this study, we show that specific knowledge gaps and misconceptions exist among University students about SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 and their prevalence is associated with negative attitudes toward people with COVID-19. Our findings highlight the integrated nature of knowledge and attitude and suggest that improvements to the former could contribute to improvements in the latter.
  • Publication
    Effect of public health interventions during the first epidemic wave of COVID-19 in Cyprus: a modelling study
    (BioMed Central Ltd, 2021-12)
    Ilias Gountas
    ;
    Annalisa Quattrocchi
    ;
    Ioannis Mamais
    ;
    Eirini Christaki
    ;
    Konstantinos Fokianos
    ;
    Georgios Nikolopoulos
    ;
    Background: Cyprus addressed the first wave of SARS CoV-2 (COVID-19) by implementing non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs). The aims of this study were: a) to estimate epidemiological parameters of this wave including infection attack ratio, infection fatality ratio, and case ascertainment ratio, b) to assess the impact of public health interventions and examine what would have happened if those interventions had not been implemented. Methods: A dynamic, stochastic, individual-based Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered (SEIR) model was developed to simulate COVID-19 transmission and progression in the population of the Republic of Cyprus. The model was fitted to the observed trends in COVID-19 deaths and intensive care unit (ICU) bed use. Results: By May 8th, 2020, the infection attack ratio was 0.31% (95% Credible Interval [CrI]: 0.15, 0.54%), the infection fatality ratio was 0.71% (95% CrI: 0.44, 1.61%), and the case ascertainment ratio was 33.2% (95% CrI: 19.7, 68.7%). If Cyprus had not implemented any public health measure, the healthcare system would have been overwhelmed by April 14th. The interventions averted 715 (95% CrI: 339, 1235) deaths. If Cyprus had only increased ICU beds, without any social distancing measure, the healthcare system would have been overwhelmed by April 19th. Conclusions: The decision of the Cypriot authorities to launch early NPIs limited the burden of the first wave of COVID-19. The findings of these analyses could help address the next waves of COVID-19 in Cyprus and other similar settings.
  • Publication
    Extensive Testing and Public Health Interventions for the Control of COVID-19 in the Republic of Cyprus between March and May 2020
    (MDPI, 2020-11) ;
    Annalisa Quattrocchi
    ;
    Ioannis Mamais
    ;
    Eirini Christaki
    ;
    Costas Constantinou
    ;
    Maria Koliou
    ;
    Zoi-Dorothea Pana
    ;
    Valentinos Silvestros
    ;
    Fani Theophanous
    ;
    Christos Haralambous
    ;
    Androulla Stylianou
    ;
    Sotiroula Sotiriou
    ;
    Maria Athanasiadou
    ;
    Theopisti Kyprianou
    ;
    Anna Demetriou
    ;
    Christiana A. Demetriou
    ;
    Ourania Kolokotroni
    ;
    Ioanna Gregoriou
    ;
    Niki Paphitou
    ;
    George Panos
    ;
    Leontios Kostrikis
    ;
    Peter Karayiannis
    ;
    Georgios Petrikkos
    ;
    Petros Agathangelou
    ;
    George Mixides
    ;
    Georgios Siakallis
    ;
    Linos Hadjihannas
    ;
    Lakis Palazis
    ;
    Anna Vavlitou
    ;
    Chrystalla Matsentidou-Timiliotou
    ;
    Dimitris Koukios
    ;
    Tonia Adamidi
    ;
    Frangiskos Frangopoulos
    ;
    Elizabeth Constantinou
    ;
    Georgios Nikolopoulos
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has significantly affected the well-being of individuals worldwide. We herein describe the epidemiology of COVID-19 in the Republic of Cyprus during the first epidemic wave (9 March–3 May 2020). We analyzed surveillance data from laboratory-confirmed cases, including targeted testing and population screening. Statistical analyses included logistic regression. During the surveillance period, 64,136 tests (7322.3 per 100,000) were performed, 873 COVID-19 cases were diagnosed, and 20 deaths were reported (2.3%). Health-care workers (HCWs) represented 21.4% of cases. Overall, 19.1% of cases received hospital care and 3.7% required admission to Intensive Care Units. Male sex (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR): 3.04; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.97–4.69), increasing age (aOR: 1.56; 95%CI: 1.36–1.79), symptoms at diagnosis (aOR: 6.05; 95%CI: 3.18–11.50), and underlying health conditions (aOR: 2.08; 95%CI: 1.31–3.31) were associated with hospitalization. For recovered cases, the median time from first to last second negative test was 21 days. Overall, 119 primary cases reported 616 close contacts, yielding a pooled secondary attack rate of 12% (95%CI: 9.6–14.8%). Three population-based screening projects, and two projects targeting employees and HCWs, involving 25,496 people, revealed 60 positive individuals (0.2%). Early implementation of interventions with targeted and expanded testing facilitated prompt outbreak control on the island.
  • Publication
    Influenza vaccination among infection control teams: A EUCIC survey prior to COVID-19 pandemic
    (Elsevier Ltd, 2020-12-14) ;
    Şiran Keske
    ;
    Nico T. Mutters
    ;
    Önder Ergönül
    We aimed to describe the influenza vaccination rate and its determinants among infection control team (ICT) across different countries. Online multilingual survey consisting of 23 items, between 17 May −15 July of 2019 targeting the opinions and practices of ICTs regarding the 2018–2019 influenza season was employed. Participants were reached via European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and European Union Certificate for Infection Control (EUCIC) newsletters, social media, and national societies. In total, 899 participants from 56 countries responded to the survey. The overall vaccination rate was 76%, being the highest in Finland, Portugal, Norway, and Israel (100%), whereas the lowest in Italy (68%) and Turkey (39%). Influenza vaccination rate was 86% among IC physicians and 52% among IC nurses. The most significant factors affecting participants’ decision were personal influenza vaccine experience (49%) and attitude of the scientific authorities (48%). In multivariate analysis, vaccination of the ICT head (OR: 16.04, 95%CI: 8.4–30.8, p < 0.001) and having free vaccine (OR: 7.56, 95%CI: 2.1–27.4, p = 0.02) were found to be the strongest predictors for influenza vaccination, whereas working in Turkey (OR: 0.41, 95%CI: 0.22–0.77, p = 0.006) and being an IC nurse (OR:0.43, 95%CI: 0.24–0.80, p = 0.007) were significantly associated with not having been vaccinated. In conclusion, COVID-19 pandemic increased the importance of protection against respiratory viruses including influenza. Vaccination strategies should have a special emphasis on IC nurses, who have a relatively lower vaccination rate, should enhance the vaccination of the ICT leaders, and put effort to provide free availability of the influenza vaccine.